From The Web

BRAINPICKINGS: PATTI SMITH’S 50 FAVORITE BOOKS

In this post at BRAINPICKINGS, Maria Popova compiles a list of books Patti Smith mentions in her book M Train. - "Much like the lifelong reading list extracted from Gabriel García Márquez’s autobiography, I’ve assembled a reading list of the books Smith mentions in her memoir — some in direct and effusive homages, others obliquely, all lovingly."
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OF BOURBON AND BLACK BEAUTIES: NAN GOLDIN AND COOKIE MUELLER IN PROVINCETOWN! (VICE)

America used to have sanctuaries across the country where fuck-ups, weirdos and other "marginalized" people could hide out and live without much contact with "straight" America. Places like downtown New York City in the East and West Village, Haight Ashbury in San Francisco, and, of course, Provincetown, that great artistic outpost at the very tip of Cape Cod. All these locations provided affordable living, while tolerating bizarre lifestyles. Hallelujah!
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SSHH WITH BLONDIE AND SEX PISTOLS MEMBERS BENEFIT GIG!

It's just another Tuesday night in the Tribeca area of New York City. As I enter The Roxy Hotel's toasty Django Bar, I see a room full of familiar faces. Littered across the intimate space were a gaggle of elite rockers known to swim in the same circles as the uninhibited downtown crowd. Rock photographer's Bob Gruen and Mick Rock, Andy Rourke of The Smiths, Bob Bert of Lydia Lunch's Retrovirus, David Johansen, Chris Franz of the Talking Heads, among other notables.
Legs McNeil and Gillian McCain

GILLIAN MCCAIN AND LEGS MCNEIL ON THE 20TH ANNIVERSARY OF PLEASE KILL ME! (DOWNTOWN MAGAZINE NYC)

As authors of Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History Of Punk, Gillian McCain and Legs McNeil influenced a lot of people on several levels. Now regarded as the best-selling book on punk rock of all time, Please Kill Me first and foremost described what the heyday of the New York City punk scene was like as according to people that were around it. It cleared up myths about key players in the scene, and also helped readers pick up on some of the era’s underappreciated characters.